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Adventures in Restorative Listening

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Admin Feature Gui !EXCLUSIVE!



The password is set during the Sun Ray server configuration. If you can't remember the administration password, you can use the utconfig -w command to reconfigure the administration software, including the password. To change the administration password, use the Advanced tab in the Admin GUI.




Admin Feature Gui



To allow another user account to perform administrative functions, see How to Enable or Disable Multiple Administration Accounts (Oracle Linux) or How to Enable or Disable Multiple Administration Accounts (Oracle Solaris).


Be sure the new feature code is not a duplicate of a code used elsewhere already. (The system will not warn you of duplicates.) Also, the feature code should be absolutely unique. Using *12 and *123 may cause an issue in some versions.


It is easy to change a customized feature code back to its system default, and you do not have to remember what the original default was. The system will take care of it for you when you de-select the Customize option.


Your feature code is in a customized state if the Customize button is dark blue and the Code field has a white background and is editable.For example, here we changed our Blacklist feature code to *9 as shown earlier.


To disable a feature code, click the Enable button to turn it to light blue in color, then click the Submit button followed by the red Apply Config button.


To enable a feature code, click the Enable button to turn it to dark blue in color, then click the Submit button followed by the red Apply Config button.


In this example, two types of users on the AAA server (ISE), respectively the adminuser, and the helpdeskuser are configured. These users are part of the admin-group and the helpdesk-group groups respectively. The user adminuser, part of the admin-group, is expected to be granted full access to the WLC. On the other hand, the helpdeskuser, part of the helpdesk-group, is meant to only be granted monitor privileges to the WLC. Hence, there is no configuration access.


In order to have administrator access rights, the adminuser needs to have a privilege level of 15, which allows to access the exec prompt shell. On the other hand, the helpdeskuser does not need exec prompt shell access and can therefore be assigned with a privilege level lower than 15. In order to assign the proper privilege level to users, authorization profiles can be used. These can be configured from the ISE GUI Page Policy > Policy Elements > Results, under the tab Authorization > Authorization Profiles shown in the next picture.


To configure a new authorization profile, use the Add button, which opens the new authorization profile configuration form. This form must especially look like this to configure the profile that is assigned to the adminuser.


The configuration showed grants privilege level 15 to any user to which it is associated. As mentioned before, this is the expected behavior for the adminuser that is created during the next step. However, the helpdeskuser must have a lower privilege level, and therefore a second policy element must be created.


After this step has been completed, the credentials configured for adminuser and helpdesk user can be used to authenticate in the WLC via the GUI or through Telnet/SSH.


Once the Device Administration licenses are installed, you must enable the Device Admin feature for the node in order to be able to use ISE as the TACACS+ server. In order to do so, edit the configuration of the ISE deployment node used, which can be found under Administrator > Deployment, and click its name or do so with the help of the Edit button.


In order to have administrator access rights, the adminuser needs to have a privilege level of 15, which allows to access the exec prompt shell. On the other hand, the helpdeskuser does not need exec prompt shell access and can therefore be assigned with a privilege level lower than 15. In order to assign the proper privilege level to users, authorization profiles can be used. These can be configured from the ISE GUI page Work Centers > Device Administration > Policy Elements, under the tab Results > TACACS Profiles as shown in the next picture.


In order to configure a new TACACS profile, use the Add button, which opens the new profile configuration form similar to the one shown in the picture. This form must especially look like this to configure the profile that is assigned to the adminuser (which is, with shell privileges level 15).


To create a device administration policy set, use the add button framed in red in the previous image, this adds an item to the policy sets list. Provide a name for the newly created set, a condition under which it must be applied, and the Allowed Protocols/Server Sequence (here, the Default Device Admin suffices). Use the Save button to finalize the addition of the policy set and use the arrowhead on its right to access its configuration page, as it looks on the one depicted.


After this step has been completed, the credentials configured for adminuser and helpdesk users can be used to authenticate in the WLC via the GUI or with Telnet/SSH.


In Windows Server 2008, you could use the Windows Server Backup feature and ntdsutil authoritative restore command to mark objects as authoritative to ensure that the restored data was replicated throughout the domain. The drawback to the authoritative restore solution was that it had to be performed in Directory Services Restore Mode (DSRM). During DSRM, the domain controller being restored had to remain offline. Therefore, it was not able to service client requests.


In Windows Server 2003 Active Directory and Windows Server 2008 AD DS, you could recover deleted Active Directory objects through tombstone reanimation. However, reanimated objects' link-valued attributes (for example, group memberships of user accounts) that were physically removed and non-link-valued attributes that were cleared were not recovered. Therefore, administrators could not rely on tombstone reanimation as the ultimate solution to accidental deletion of objects. For more information about tombstone reanimation, see Reanimating Active Directory Tombstone Objects.


What's new? In Windows Server 2012 and newer, the Active Directory Recycle Bin feature is enhanced with a new graphical user interface for users to manage and restore deleted objects. Users can now visually locate a list of deleted objects and restore them to their original or desired locations.


In Windows Server 2012 and newer, fine-grained password policy management is made easier and more visual by providing a user interface for AD DS administrators to manage them in ADAC. Administrators can now view a given user's resultant policy, view and sort all password policies within a given domain, and manage individual password policies visually.


ADAC is a user interface tool built on top of Windows PowerShell. In Windows Server 2012 and newer, IT administrators can leverage ADAC to learn Windows PowerShell for Active Directory cmdlets by using the Windows PowerShell History Viewer. As actions are executed in the user interface, the equivalent Windows PowerShell command is shown to the user in Windows PowerShell History Viewer. This allows administrators to create automated scripts and reduce repetitive tasks, thus increasing IT productivity. Also, this feature reduces the time to learn Windows PowerShell for Active Directory and increases the users' confidence in the correctness of their automation scripts.


In Windows Server, the Server Manager console and Windows PowerShell cmdlets for Server Manager allow installation of roles and features to local or remote servers, or offline virtual hard disks (VHDs). You can install multiple roles and features on a single remote server or offline VHD in a single add Roles and Features Wizard or Windows PowerShell session.


Server Manager cannot be used to manage a newer release of the Windows Server operating system. Server Manager running on Windows Server 2012 R2 or Windows 8.1 cannot be used to install roles, role services, and features on servers that are running Windows Server 2016.


You must be logged on to a server as an administrator to install or uninstall roles, role services, and features. If you are logged on to the local computer with an account that does not have administrator rights on your target server, right-click the target server in the Servers tile, and then click Manage As to provide an account that has administrator rights. The server on which you want to mount an offline VHD must be added to Server Manager, and you must have Administrator rights on that server.


In a single session in the add Roles and Features Wizard, you can install roles, role services, and features on the local server, a remote server that has been added to Server Manager, or an offline VHD. For more information about how to add a server to Server Manager to manage, see Add Servers to Server Manager.


If you are running Server Manager on Windows Server 2016 or Windows 10, you can use the add Roles and Features Wizard to install roles and features only on servers and offline VHDs that are running Windows Server 2016.


On the Select installation type page, select Role-based or feature-based installation to install all parts of roles or features on a single server, or Remote Desktop Services installation to install either a virtual machine-based desktop infrastructure or a session-based desktop infrastructure for Remote Desktop Services. The Remote Desktop Services installation option distributes logical parts of the Remote Desktop Services role across different servers as needed by administrators. Click Next. 041b061a72


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